what impact had Eavan Boland’s Poetry on you?

Forums Leaving Cert English what impact had Eavan Boland’s Poetry on you?

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    • #1332

      write about the impact that Eavan Bolands poetry had on you as a reader.
      include in your answer:
      themes of poems
      images
      language

    • #16290

    • #16291

      omg!!!

      I got 9 honours nd 2 passes in d jc!!

      yay!
      :D😀
      hw did every1 else?
      :) steph x

    • #16292

      write about the impact that Eavan Bolands poetry had on you as a reader.
      include in your answer:
      themes of poems
      images
      language

      Eavan Boland’s poetry had the impact on me as a reader of appreciating poetry. Her poetry achieved this through how it links with her life (a prominent theme), its perceptiveness of Irishness, history and myth, its treating of the suburbs as a suitable locale for her poetry (another prominent theme) and its use of language and imagery.
      The poems I am studying are The War Horse, Child of Our Time, Love, The Pomegranate, This Moment and The Shadow Doll.

      As said, the poetry of Eavan Boland had the impact of making me appreciate poetry through how it links with her life, one of her themes. Boland includes a personal perspective in her poetry. By doing so, she shows how poetry is real in that what she writes about is not simply fantastical or whimsical enough to entertain a reader or an editor, but shows that poetry is real and intense, about matters that matter to the poet and thus to us.
      This is seen with The War Horse. Boland links this poem to the troubles of Northern Ireland; it is written in 1975 – the 1970’s were a time of violence for Northern Ireland and of trouble even for those south of the border where Boland was living – these people had to endure violence occurring close to their homes and live with the threat/possibility of it spilling down into southern Ireland. In doing so, Boland allows us a perspective to view the poem. She is comparing the horse to violence in Northern Ireland. The horse intruding into the suburb she lives in, ‘like a rumour of war, huge,/ Threatening’ is like the intrusion of violence into Northern, and to a greater extent, Irish life. Boland even uses such words as ‘a maimed limb’ as comparisons to gardens uprooted to make the comparison more concrete. We see this again with Child of Our Time. Boland wrote the poem in May 1974, the time of the Dublin bombings while she still lived in Ireland – the child spoken of in the poem was seen by Boland in a newspaper photo, his dead body being taken out of the rubble by a policeman following the bombings. Again a biographical detail allows a viewpoint for the poem. Boland writes that it was ‘We who should have known’; while she was not directly responsible for the bombings, she remarks that she and the whole world are involved, somehow, in how the world is shaped today, a world where innocent children are victims of the worlds’ petty disagreements. More of the same is seen in Love. The poem is based on while Boland lived in Iowa in the 1970’s with her family. In the poem Boland is suffering with the strain of her relationship with her husband; this is not helped by being away from home, as well as other problems such as with her children – she makes mention of such problems as when one of her children contracted meningitis and was ‘touched by death in this town’.

      Another reason the poetry of Eavan Boland had the impact of making me appreciate poetry is its perspective on Irishness, history and myth. This is because through this quality of her poetry I saw that poetry does not appeal to one audience; it holds resonance for many as poetry can hold numerous different references. Boland’s poetry has a universal viewpoint; her poetry applies for all and not just me and a few select others.
      Boland’s poetry in places holds resonance for those Irish. For instance, she talks of the suffering of the Irish during the times of the Famine in The Famine Road, something all readers Irish or connected with Ireland can identify with. She makes mention not of the starving of the Irish, but how they were exploited by the English. Sir Charles Edward Trevelyan remarks of the Irish that ‘their bones need toil, their characters no less’ and orders ‘give them no coins at all’. Boland’s poetry is not exclusively for the Irish however; it delves into the past with the Victorian tradition of The Shadow Doll. Here she uses this historical reference of the ‘porcelain bride in an airless glamour’ to identify with many brides-to-be on the night before their wedding, contemplating upon the ensuing situation that will mould and change their lives forever. However, unlike the Victorian brides-to-be who had their wedding and life arranged and controlled for them; it was ‘they’ who ‘made hoops for the crinoline’, it is Boland who ‘locks’ – she is not being controlled in her marriage. Another example of the universality of Boland’s poetry is seen with its mythological references. Again such poems of Boland’s can appeal to anyone; myths are read by all worldwide. Anyone can relate to Boland in Love as she compares herself to Aeneas meeting Dido in the Underworld; she wishes to return to her husband of the past but in her memories, like Dido, all he does is ‘walk away and I cannot follow’.

      As well as its perspective on Irishness, history and myth, a further reason Boland’s poetry had the impact of making me appreciate poetry is its treating of the suburbs as a suitable locale for her poetry, another prominent theme in her poetry. As a resident of a suburb, I appreciate the link. Her poetry takes place in areas I am used to and I like that poetry can take place in areas as ordinary as where I live. I appreciate that poetry is not limited to the extraordinary, as well as Boland’s ability to use what she is used to, what is around her, to create poetry.
      An example of this is seen with The War Horse. Boland here compares the intrusion of violence into Northern Irish life to a horse passing through where she lives, an ordinary suburb with a ‘short street’, ‘The stone of our house’ and ‘the subterfuge// Of curtains.’ Elsewhere, Boland celebrates the magic of the relationship between a woman and child by capturing the moment when the child has ‘run into her arms’ in This Moment. This moment is celebrated in the most ordinary of suburbs, where ‘stars rise’ and ‘moths flutter’. Boland sums up the suburb’s commonness by calling it simply ‘A neighbourhood’. More of the same is seen with The Pomegranate as Boland examines the relationship with her child, but again in a suburb. Boland laments that her daughter, like Persephone, will soon be ‘lost in hell’. However this lament takes place in the suburb that she lives in, with ‘every leaf/ on every tree on that road’ and where ‘The rain is cold’ and ‘The road is flint-coloured.’ Boland even declares that this ‘suburb has cars and cable television’.

      A final way the poetry of Eavan Boland had the impact of making me appreciate poetry is through its use of language and imagery. Boland describes the worlds of her poetry to the finest detail. No image or description is omitted. Reading Boland’s poetry is startlingly real, a quality I appreciate; I appreciate that poetry can be as real as the world around me, not just words on a page I read.
      We see this with The War Horse. Many images and descriptions are used by Boland to show not what is affecting the garden (the horse and violence) but the damaging effect on the garden itself (and Northern and southern Ireland). She compares images such as ‘maimed limb’ and ‘burned countryside’ to a ‘rose, a hedge, a crocus’ which are ‘uprooted’ to link the effect on the garden to the effect of violence on Northern Ireland. Descriptions such as ‘a rose which now will never climb’ work to the same effect. Another example is seen with The Shadow Doll, where we see everything from ‘the oyster gleam of the veil’ to the ‘spray of seed pearls’ and ‘the bisque features’. Likewise we even have described for us of how the shadow doll ‘Under glass, under wraps, it stays/ even now, after all, discreet about/ visits, fevers, quickenings and lusts’. We see this again in The Pomegranate where Boland describes a ‘city of fogs and strange consonants,’ and shows us even such images as ‘whitebeams/ and wasps and honey-scented buddleias.’

      As shown, Eavan Boland’s poetry had the quality of making me appreciate poetry and its content. It achieves this through themes such as how her poetry links with her life and its treating of the suburbs as a locale for it, as well as its perceptiveness of Irishness, history and myth and its use of language and imagery.

      http://www.allhonours.ie/content/english_leaving_certificate_grinds

    • #16293

      im doing the exact same essay this week…………..should be fun
      do you think eavan boland has a feminism approach to her poetry e.g her feelings of being trapped in wedding or the cold authority figures in famine road are male

      maybe an intresting approach but some elses opinion would help?

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